Wednesday, January 20, 2016

let's make money using common sense: Things to Know About Investing Your Money

let's make money using common sense: Things to Know About Investing Your Money: Investing is easy. Just watch  “The Wolf of Wall Street.”  All you do is get some buddies together, pool your money, buy low, sell high an...

Things to Know About Investing Your Money

Investing is easy. Just watch “The Wolf of Wall Street.” All you do is get some buddies together, pool your money, buy low, sell high and then find a place big enough for your private jet and sports cars.
Investing doesn’t work like that in real life — and you probably won’t get super-rich in a short time. But by learning the basics of how to invest your money through a long-term approach, you can safely and securely grow your money over time.
1. Do I need a lot to start investing?
It is natural to think that investing is for people with throwaway money, but over time, pennies turn into Rupee. “Being a financial adviser for over 27 years, it amazes me how some people are able to accumulate so much money even if they don’t have huge incomes.” 

“It is a systematic approach, and over time, by investing small amounts on a regular basis, people are able to accumulate large nest eggs.”

Why you care: Start now with whatever you have. Time is a greater asset than money.
2. What about risk?
The first rule of investing is that the potential for gain comes with the potential for loss. The higher the potential payout, the bigger the risk of losing money. Conservative investments like bonds are far less dangerous than highly risky investments such as penny stocks, but they don’t have nearly the potential for a big windfall. There is no such thing as a safe bet.
Why you care: If someone pitches an investment as “guaranteed,” “risk-free” or “can’t lose,” walk away. All investments come with risk — without exception.
3. What’s the value in diversification?
The old adage “don’t put all your eggs in one basket” was never more true than it is for investing. By spreading your money around different investments, you hedge your bets and protect yourself against a singular, catastrophic loss.
If you put all of your money in Abc Co, and Abc co goes under, you go under with it. If abc co is just part of a larger blend of investments, you can absorb the loss and move on.
Why you care: It is important to create a portfolio with a wide variety of investments. Diversification is your greatest protection against risk.
4. Are a few stocks enough for diversification? 
“Avoid individual stocks and invest in a low-cost, diversified Equity fund's over time.”

“Warren Buffet would tell you the same thing. If you’re a us, this is just glorified gambling and likely to cost you a lot more than it will make you.”
Why you care: Beginner investors are often intimidated by the market and simply choose to buy stock in a company they like or that someone tipped them off about. Don’t pick individual stocks — that’s the opposite of diversification.

5. What is the stock market?
The stock market is a marketplace in which shares of publicly traded companies are issued and traded. This enables companies to raise vital capital, and it gives investors like you the chance to make money by buying into these companies — and to benefit from their financial achievement. 
Why you care: The stock market is crucial to the national and global economy, and it is one of the best ways to invest money.
6. What are stock exchanges?
The stock market consists of individual stock exchanges, which exist to ensure fair and accurate trading. Stock exchanges exist all over the world. They are the physical marketplaces that make up the concept of the “stock market.” Among the most famous exchanges in the world are the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq.
Why you care: These marketplaces are where some of your most important investments will be bought and sold.
7. What are indexes? 
Indexes are a crucial component of measuring the health of the stock market. Indexes are imaginary portfolios of securities, each of which uses its own method of calculation.The S&P BSE Sensex is a “index of 30 well-established and financially sound companies listed on Bombay Stock Exchange" OR NSE's flagship index, the CNX Nifty,the 50 stock index, is used extensively by investors in India and around the world as a barometer of the Indian capital markets and is commonly used as a benchmark for the entire stock market.
Why you care: Indexes reflect the health of the overall market.
8. What are securities?
Security refer to financial instruments with some kind of financial value. Securities can be stocks, bonds or the rights to ownership, which are called options. Securities are generally either debt securities, which represent money owed, and equities, like stocks.
Why you care: If you decide to invest, you will almost certainly purchase securities 
9. What are stocks?
Stocks, also called “equities,” are securities that represent partial ownership in a company. Companies sell stock to raise money or to pay off debt. People purchase them for capital appreciation, which means that when the value of a company grows, so does your stock price. Some stocks pay dividends 
Why you care: Many funds available to you contain stocks purchased on the stock market.
10. What are bonds?
Bonds are debt securities, like IOUs (IOU' An informal document that acknowledges a debt owed. IOU is an abbreviation, in phonetic terms, of "I owe you." The debt owed does not necessarily involve a monetary value but can also involve other product) . Governments and corporations issue bonds to raise money. Unlike stocks, in which the investor is buying into the company, a bond represent a loan that is to be repaid with interest. Bonds are safe and predictable and — if allowed to mature — preserve the initial capital. Bonds are often included in funds to mitigate riskier investments.
Why you care: Bonds are among the most common investments and will likely be a part of any fund you buy.
11. What is the difference between corporate and government bonds?
Bonds are issued by both private and public sector entities. Earnings on GOVT. PSU bonds aren’t taxed, but the rates of return are lower. Corporate bonds pay higher returns, but the investor must pay taxes on earned interest.
Why you care: Your income tax rate will decide which kind of bond is right for you.
12. What are mutual funds?
Mutual funds pool money from many investors to be housed in one large portfolio. Mutual funds are diversified and may contain stocks, bonds or other securities. Investors like them because they are managed by professionals who do research and execute trades. Those managers take a fee, making mutual funds more costly than passively managed funds like index funds.
Why you care: Mutual funds are a common choice for beginning investors.
13. What are index funds?
Unlike mutual funds, which are actively managed, index funds are passively managed portfolios designed to mirror the performance of a specific index, like the Dow Jones or the S&P 500. Index funds are popular because they provide instant diversification.
Why you care: Unlike mutual funds, index funds are not actively managed because they simply mirror an index. Therefore, they have very low fees
14. What are exchange-traded funds?
Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are like mutual funds in allowing investors to pool their money in a large fund. But they are bought and sold in shares during regular trading hours on stock exchanges, hence the name. ETFs are not mutual funds. They can only be bought and sold in market transactions and cannot be sold retail directly to investors. Many different kinds of funds, including index funds, can be bought as ETFs.
Why you care: ETFs are very popular because they allow average investors to purchase shares of funds in small amounts.

15. What are hedge funds?
Hedge funds are yet another way to for groups of people to pool their money to purchase a large portfolio. Hedge funds, however, are not regulated nearly as heavily as mutual funds, and they generally are open only to accredited investors. Accredited investors are generally wealthier with high incomes and significant capital and assets. If you are a beginning investor, you will probably not be investing in a hedge fund. 
Why you care: Anyone asking a beginning investor with modest resources to invest in a hedge fund could be running a scam. 
16. What are penny stocks?
Penny stocks are low-priced stocks, sometimes trading for just a few pennies a share, and never for more than Rs.5. The lure of penny stocks is that many giant, global companies started out as penny stocks, and investors who bought thousands of shares in the beginning when the stock traded for just few Rupee made enormous returns. The downside is that most penny stock companies will never amount to anything.
Why you care: Penny stocks are incredibly risky. Many penny stock traders target our investors. Avoid them until you are competent and confident that you can decipher the often-foggy reporting that comes with penny stock investing.
17. How do I buy securities?
Although some companies allow direct purchasing, the overwhelming majority of stocks have to be purchased through a licensed broker. You tell your stockbroker how much of a given stock you want to buy, and he or she executes the trade.
Why you care: You need a broker to invest in the stock market.
18. What is the difference between a discount broker and a full-service broker?
Full-service stockbrokers give advice and tips to their clients, but they take a hefty fee. Discount brokers operate online and only execute trades, for just a few Rupee a trade.
Why you care:  Some investors have long-term relationships with their brokers. Other people will never meet or even speak to the people who execute their trades. This depends on whether you employ a discount broker or a full-service broker.
19. If I’m just starting out, don’t I need advice from a full-service broker?
It may seem counter intuitive, but full-service brokers often handle more experienced clients with more complicated investment needs. Our investors often invest in simpler vehicles, like mutual funds. In these scenarios, investors often choose to save money on trades by picking a fund.
Why you care: You need to decide if the advice from a full-service broker is worth paying for.
20. What is Rupee-cost averaging?
Rupee-cost averaging is a strategy where investors contribute the same amount of money consistently over time. If you invest, say Rs.5000 a month, in an Diversified fund without regard to the fluctuating price of the stock, you’ll wind up buying more of it when it is cheaper and less of it when it is more expensive.
Why you care: Emotions are important for long-term investing. “If the market rises after your initial investment, you can feel good about how your portfolio has performed and how smart you were for not delaying investing".
If, on the other hand, the market has fallen, you can feel good about the opportunity to now buy at lower prices and how smart you were for not putting all of your money in at one time. Either way, you win from a psychological perspective.”
21. Will I be paid dividends?
Dividends are a portion of company earnings paid back to investors, through a Rupee amount or a percentage of market price, called “dividend yields.” 
Why you care: Not all companies pay dividends.
22. Who regulates Indian's investment world?
The Securities and Exchange Board of India 
Why you care: This branch of the government exists to protect investors and maintain fair, orderly markets.
23. What do I do if I think I’ve been scammed?
Contact the http://scores.gov.in/ right away if you think a person or company misrepresented a security or any other investment.
Why you care: Anytime money changes hands, unscrupulous people will try to take advantage for profit — especially when it comes to us.
24. Should I consider day trading?
Day traders seek fast, short-term gains by buying and selling in high volume throughout the trading day.
Why you care:  Often glamorized as a fast path to big money, day trading is actually quite risky. The Sebi warns against the practice.

25. Is short selling right for beginners?
Short selling, which involves betting against a stock, involves the selling of a security the investor doesn’t own. A broker loans the investor shares of stock out of his or her own inventory. Eventually, you have to “close” the short by buying those shares back to return to the broker. If the stock loses value after you borrowed it, you can buy it back cheaper and keep the profits.
Why you care: Short selling is a popular form of investing you may want to try once you master the basics. 
26. What is foreign exchange?
Foreign exchange involves investing in, buying, selling or trading different kinds of international currency.
Why you care: The global foreign exchange market is by far the largest market in the world.
27. What are commodities?
Commodities are physical goods that are basically the same no matter who produces them, such as oil or gold.
Why you care: Commodities markets are among the most lucrative and heavily traded in the world.
28. What is futures trading?
Futures are contracts that obligate an investor to purchase goods like commodities at a later date. This strategy is often used to hedge or speculate.
Why you care: Futures trading allows you to bid on a range of goods for both long and short investments. 
29. What’s the difference between options and futures?
They are very similar, but options are contracts that give investors the opportunity to buy instead of obligating them.
Why you care: Managers often use options to hedge or to speculate, which could lower or increase the risk associated with your fund.

Ritesh.Sheth CWM®
CHARTERED WEALTH MANAGER

              Helping you invest better...  

Allaudin Bldg Shop No 1,Manchubhai Road,Malad East,Mumbai - 400097.
Shop No.9,Param Ratan Bldg,Jakaria Road,Malad West,Mumbai - 400064.
Tel:28891775/28816101/28828756/28823279. CELL:9930444099  
www.tejasconsultancy.co.in | E-mail Us: ritesh@tejasconsultancy.co.in
Go Green...Save a tree. Don't print this e-mail unless it's really necessary

Disclaimer:
This emailer is addressed to and intended for the investors of Ritesh Sheth & Tejas Consultancy only and is not spam. You are advised to contact Ritesh Sheth & Tejas Consultancy to clarify any issue that you may have with regards to any information contained in this emailer.The views are personal. Ritesh Sheth & Family or Tejas Consultancy does not guarantee the accuracy, adequacy or completeness of any information in this emailer and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for results obtained from the use of such information. Ritesh Sheth & Family or Tejas Consultancy does not have any liability to any person on account of the use of information provided herein and the said information is provided on a best effort basis. In case of investments in any of our schemes, please read the offer documents carefully before investing.
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Wednesday, January 13, 2016

How I Talk to My Kids About Money....

How I Talk to My Kids About Money....


Kids can understand more than we think they can about money. A lot more. I know it, because I have one sons, ages 14, who aren’t content to just have savings accounts at the bank. He also have his own Postal Recurring Account. And, yes – he is contributing to those accounts. Aggressively.
Here’s how it happened. I grew up in a home where we discuss finances very often. We have money to invest, and it's a topic my parents understood particularly well as we all are in to financial business. When my wife and I had children, we agreed we would take a different route. We would treat our son like adults when it came to finances, to whatever degree he could understand the concepts involved.

Involving children in financial discussions from an early age helps teach them to true value of money.

A Weekly Allowance
We started, naturally, with an allowance, which we based upon his age. So when he were six years old, he could get Rs.60.00 a week, when he were eight years old, he could get Rs.80.00 a week, etc. Notice that I said “could get.” It wasn’t guaranteed. he had responsibilities to perform for that allowance, and failure would result in deductions. Plus, he had to ask for his allowance on Sundays – getting it wasn’t automatic. From this, we wanted to teach him that money had to be earned, and that nothing is a “given” in life: you have to ask for what you want and need.
A Family Discussion
About the time he were six , we began to involve him in Basic accounting with my father. on Every Sunday, and at that time my father discuss our finances in depth. We included him in that dialogue so that he understood in very general terms what my family had invested, where we invested it, and what our decisions were based on.
At first, of course, we kept things very high level for him. But as the years progressed, he started to stay longer during those meetings, asked more questions, and understood more.
A Circle of Trust
When we tell people that our son – as young as they are – have a full and complete understanding of the financial status of the family, they are often shocked. But here’s the key: we have established what we call a “circle of trust” in our family. We made an agreement with him that anything relating to our financial status can never be discussed with anybody outside the family. Otherwise, the trust will be broken and he will never be involved in these conversations again. he understand that, and he respect it.
A Personal Decision
It did not come as a surprise when our sons started to get more involved with own money. He already had savings accounts which we had set up, but upon his request, we set up Postal Recurring account for him as well. Being boy, they are highly competitive … so they are in a never-ending sibling race to see who can save and invest the most money!
An Understanding of Value
Building on the foundation of understanding they had formed by being exposed to financial matters both as a family and as individuals, my sons started asking questions about the real value of money. Not “What does the latest tech toy cost?” but the much larger question: “Why is money valuable?”
Here is our answer: money is valuable because it gives you freedom and flexibility.
That’s it. It doesn’t buy happiness, and it’s not about baubles and gadgets. The real issue isn’t whether you make a salary of four digits, six digits, or eight digits: that doesn’t bring happiness, either. The real value of money is that it gives you the freedom to make your own choices and not to have to do things you don’t want to do, and it gives you the flexibility to do the fun things that you do want to do. So the value of earning and saving is to gain freedom and flexibility.
At 12 and 14, we are now having family dialogues about how to understand risk-return trade-offs, how to balance a portfolio, how to set objectives, how to approach financing their college education, and more. Our end goal is to make sure that once our sons is on his own, he will know the right way to invest so that he is not haphazard, lazy, or foolish in their decisions. With a firm financial foundation, we know our sons will be able to experience freedom and flexibility in life – that is, he can enjoy the real value of money.





-- 

Regards,

Ritesh.Sheth CWM®
CHARTERED WEALTH MANAGER

              Helping you invest better...  

Allaudin Bldg Shop No 1,Manchubhai Road,Malad East,Mumbai - 400097.
Shop No.9,Param Ratan Bldg,Jakaria Road,Malad West,Mumbai - 400064.
Tel:28891775/28816101/28828756/28823279. CELL:9930444099  
www.tejasconsultancy.co.in | E-mail Us: ritesh@tejasconsultancy.co.in
Go Green...Save a tree. Don't print this e-mail unless it's really necessary
Disclaimer:
This emailer is addressed to and intended for the investors of Ritesh Sheth & Tejas Consultancy only and is not spam. You are advised to contact Ritesh Sheth & Tejas Consultancy to clarify any issue that you may have with regards to any information contained in this emailer.The views are personal. Ritesh Sheth & Family or Tejas Consultancy does not guarantee the accuracy, adequacy or completeness of any information in this emailer and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for results obtained from the use of such information. Ritesh Sheth & Family or Tejas Consultancy does not have any liability to any person on account of the use of information provided herein and the said information is provided on a best effort basis. In case of investments in any of our schemes, please read the offer documents carefully before investing.
To unsubscribe from future mailer Please e-mail: 
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Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Being smart with your fund picks

Being smart with your fund picks


When making a buy or sell decision on a fund, it is essential to look beyond returns.

When it comes to fund managers and market strategists, this year's hero usually turns into next year's zero.

William Bernstien makes that statement in his book titled The Investor’s Manifesto. Bernstein is an American financial author, theorist and neurologist. His words are worth noting.
Irrespective of whether the decision is to invest or to liquidate, performance often becomes the sole deciding factor – an error that many investors commit unknowingly. While we vociferously advocate that returns remain an important indicator of how a fund has been able to deliver historically across varied market cycles, it is not the only factor. A more holistic approach is needed when evaluating a mutual fund from an investment perspective.
Top performing fund? Don’t live in the past!
Historical returns do provide an insight into what the fund has done in the past, but its predictive powers are definitely limited. A fund’s impressive performance is not guaranteed to be repeated in the future.
It is not without reason that the regulator, the Securities and Exchange Board of India, insists on the disclosure along the lines of: Past performance of the Sponsor/ Mutual Fund/ Investment Manager is not indicative of the future performance of the Scheme(s).
Why?
For one, performance could change if there is a change in the fund manager. It could change for better or for worse. Having said that, in most cases, it is not the issue of a fund manager change. It could simply be plain market dynamics; the stock bets that worked in the past may not work going forward. For instance, if the fund manager was stocking up on value stocks and the market favoured them, it would have worked to his benefit. If growth stocks were on a roll and value stocks were being punished, he would suffer. The stock bets that worked in the past need not work going forward.
Companies that were part of the portfolio and propelled the fund’s overall returns in the past may have either changed significantly in terms of their structure and/or their and ability to generate similar levels of return. In contrast, the constituents of the fund itself could have changed affecting the return profile of the fund.
Hence, while returns can be used as a starting or reference point, taking investment decision solely based on them could lead to financial disaster.
Top performing manager? But for whom?
Fund managers tend to have different styles, investment horizons and philosophies. Investors on the other hand tend to have varying investment goals and risk appetites. Since there is no concept of ‘assured returns’ or a ‘one size fits all’ solution in the mutual funds industry, evaluating a manager’s style and comparing the best ‘fit’ with individual investing preferences becomes essential.
A so-called top performing fund manager may be a disastrous fit for your portfolio. Let’s say he manages his fund in a volatile fashion, and while he delivers admirably, the highs and lows could churn your stomach. In that case, you should be avoiding his fund.
Understanding the styles and the differences across the investing patterns of different fund managers helps gauge the suitability of funds managed by them and prevents investors taking on additional unwarranted risks as part of their portfolio. It also encourages a higher level of investment discipline. Not all strategies are suitable for all investors. For example, large cap funds are typically considered as being lower risk as compared to a mid or small cap fund. You need to check whether the fund falls in the large-cap category, flexi-cap category, or mid-and-small cap category. You would also need to look at other parameters such as concentrated portfolios against highly diversified ones.
Investors need to first assess their requirement and then the fund’s suitability to meet their individual goals.
Don’t ignore costs.
Additional costs and increased fund expenses can eat into the income that an investor really makes. In John Bogle’s words, “The miracle of compounding returns is overwhelmed by the tyranny of compounding costs.” A higher expense ratio will tend to lower investment gains thus nullifying and/or lowering actual earnings. Bogle is an author and founder of the Vanguard Group.
Furthermore, the tax structure in India can have an impact on fixed income funds that are redeemed before the 3-year period, thus making the income from such funds taxable.
An exit load as defined by the fund documents is another factor to consider while redeeming investments. With all these different facets of costs come into play, it becomes important to take into account the actual income vs. the percentage returns that a fund is able to deliver.
In conclusion….
Investors often exit a fund due to its under performance just in time to see its returns take a 360 degree turn. While maintaining a long-term view is important, it is important to understand the reasons for short term aberrations and their possible impact over the long term.
Investment decisions should be based on a combination of fundamental strength backed by quantitative support. Look for consistency of returns and whether or not the fund manager’s style is in sync with the fund’s mandate. And don’t expect a blockbuster performance every year. William Bernstien’s words yet again: Mutual fund manager performance does not persist.

Source: Morningstar india  By Kavitha Krishnan |  02-09-15

Sunday, January 3, 2016

let's make money using common sense: Should I use a financial adviser to manage my port...

let's make money using common sense: Should I use a financial adviser to manage my port...: Should I use a financial adviser to manage my portfolio or should I save money by going it alone? - Sunil Mankotia, Banker,Thane A: That...

Should I use a financial adviser to manage my portfolio

Should I use a financial adviser to manage my portfolio or should I save money by going it alone? - Sunil Mankotia, Banker,Thane

A: That depends on how comfortable you are doing it yourself. If you are familiar with the basic concept of asset allocation and you’re comfortable choosing investments, you shouldn’t have any trouble building a low-cost diversified portfolio on your own.

Potential access to important investment news when it is most valuable Professional advice that may help improve your investment results Expert help in determining the best way to allocate your assets A trained and objective professional who can help you avoid panic selling.

Understand your needs and help you formulate long-term investment goals and objectives.
Before making specific recommendations, your advisor should try to gain a whole picture of your past experience, lifestyle and goals, as well as your other investments and current financial situation. When are you planning to retire, for example? Do you have life insurance? Do you own real estate? How secure is your job?
Help you develop realistic expectations by discussing the risks and rewards of each investment.

Every investment choice has its strengths and weaknesses, and you should never feel less than fully informed. When you ask questions, or have doubts, you should expect your financial advisor to answer honestly, and help you develop a strategy that is both realistic and comfortable for you.

Match your goals and objectives with appropriate financial product.

You should expect your advisor to make clear and specific recommendations, and explain the reasons behind them in terms you can understand. Of course, the advisor should be confident and well informed about the management and portfolio strategies of any financial product or mutual funds recommended. Continually monitor your portfolio and help you interpret performance.

Your advisor cannot influence or predict a healthiness of financial product or fund's results. However, he or she should discuss results with you and help you judge your progress. You should feel that you can always ask your advisor, "How am I doing?"
Conduct regular reviews to ensure that your strategy continues to provide optimal results for you.

One of the most valuable services your advisor can provide is to help you "stay on course" with your investment program. But "staying on course" long term does not necessarily mean staying put. Expect your financial advisor to work with you to adjust your portfolio in response to any significant change in your lifestyle, priorities, assets or responsibilities.
But you don’t necessarily have to pay an adviser to get help. 

Most people have the bulk of their savings in bank fixed deposits. offer low-cost and target returns and date; the latter is a diversified funds and bond funds portfolio that becomes more conservative as you age. Many web site or online advisor also offer free tools to help you assess your investing options and assemble a portfolio appropriate for your age and risk tolerance. According to me it offer some kind of investment advice. Taking advantage of that advice can pay off. 

In a recent Financial survey done by me at reputed company of full-time workers, people who saved the most for retirement or any long term goal used online financial advice tools and educational materials provided on web site at more than double the rate of the lowest-scoring savers.

But the do-it-yourself approach requires time to monitor your portfolio and the discipline to adjust to different market conditions. You also have to keep your emotions in check when markets are volatile, which investors admit they have a hard time doing. In a survey 65% of investors say they struggle to avoid making emotional decisions about their money during market shocks.

Even more worrisome: 81% of investors say expectations for double digit gains going forward are realistic and 54% believe their portfolios will perform better this year than last year, when Index rose by 13%. according to the survey.

Coming off three consecutive years of market returns that exceed 10%, that kind of enthusiasm is not surprising. But historically, the stock market has averaged 7% annual gains. Having an objective investment adviser can help ground your expectations in reality. And there’s evidence that some investors do better getting some professional advice.
Median annual returns for fixed deposits and holders who got professional help through advisors managed portfolio were 3.32 percentage points higher than returns for people who invested on their own, even after taking fees into account.

If you decide to go the professional route, you have choices. An adviser at a large investment firm typically charges a fee of about 1% directly or indirectly of the assets he or she manages for you. A new type of investment service known as a “robo-adviser” uses computer algorithms to build low-cost portfolios and charges as little as 0.5% a year. but again it is robo.

You should consider enlisting a financial adviser who can do more than manage your investments. A certified financial advisor takes a more holistic approach to your portfolio. They can help you figure out whether you are on track with your savings and how other investment options fit into your planed goals. 

If you decide to go it alone, you’ll need to be vigilant about monitoring your plan, and should take advantage of any free advice available to you through financial website. But as you get nearer to retirement,consulting at least once with a professional and reputable financial adviser is a wise move.

Importance of An Advisor

With the variety of investment options available today, I suggest that you seek guidance from a financial advisor. Nearly every investment entails special risks that should be discussed with an experienced professional. Your investment goals are unique, and an advisor can help you find the right financial product or fund to match your needs.

When taking a full-service approach to investing, you put a professional's training, knowledge, expertise and resources to work for you. Consider these benefits:

You may be thinking that the Internet and financial planning software can cater to all these needs, but although they are convenient tools, they cannot equal the personal attention and experience of a professional. He or she can make that difference in helping you manage your financial future.

What to Expect From a Financial Advisor

The key for investors is to define and recognise the value of professional financial services, and then insist on getting that value. When you pay a sales charge or a fee, what can you expect a professional to do for you? Your advisor should at least:
These are the basic services that investors should expect from their financial advisors. Beyond the basics, many investors could use even more specialised assistance, like advice on retirement plan distribution options, setting up and servicing retirement plans for small businesses and self-employed individuals, developing tax-advantaged strategies for children's college education, insurance, estate, and trust planning; and year-end mutual fund tax advice. If you need specialised services, there are many financial advisors who can help you obtain the help you need.



Ritesh.Sheth CWM®
CHARTERED WEALTH MANAGER

              Helping you invest better...  

Allaudin Bldg Shop No 1,Manchubhai Road,Malad East,Mumbai - 400097.
Shop No.9,Param Ratan Bldg,Jakaria Road,Malad West,Mumbai - 400064.
Tel:28891775/28816101/28828756/28823279. CELL:9930444099  
www.tejasconsultancy.co.in | E-mail Us: ritesh@tejasconsultancy.co.in
Go Green...Save a tree. Don't print this e-mail unless it's really necessary

Disclaimer:
This emailer or blog is addressed to and intended for the investors of Ritesh Sheth & Tejas Consultancy only and is not spam. You are advised to contact Ritesh Sheth & Tejas Consultancy to clarify any issue that you may have with regards to any information contained in this emailer or blog.The views are personal. Ritesh Sheth & Family or Tejas Consultancy does not guarantee the accuracy, adequacy or completeness of any information in this emailer or blog and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for results obtained from the use of such information. Ritesh Sheth & Family or Tejas Consultancy does not have any liability to any person on account of the use of information provided herein and the said information is provided on a best effort basis. In case of investments in any of schemes, please read the offer documents carefully before investing.

To unsubscribe from future mailer Please e-mail: 
info@tejasconsultancy..co.in